Talk About It Tuesday: Corrina Vaden

For the next couple of weeks, “Talk About It Tuesday” will focus on the 3 COR Warriors. Many people know these ladies but there is also a lot of people running that do not. Our goal with these is to help you get to know these ladies and why you are running this race or help you make that decision to sign up if you haven’t already.

side note: I wrote this blog prior to finding out that TODAY, May 9th, is  Corrina’s Birthday (BIG 5-0)! 

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This week I asked Corrina’s daughter, Tiffany Yacuta, to write something about her mother since Corrina unfortunately passed away at the scene. Here is what Tiffany had to say….

I have been blessed with so any compliments and well wishes about my mother since the car wreck that took her from me and my family.  People keep telling me how empowering, inspirational, beautiful, and exciting she was.  There have been so many descriptions of my mom.  I just saw her as my mom.  I wouldn’t have had it any other way honestly.  She was a great mother.  She and my father had three children by the time they were 21 years old. She raised three kids into pretty well-rounded human beings, if I do say so myself.  She was energetic, optimistic, and seemed to always be the brightest light in the room.  When my brother, sister, and I were growing up, Mom was always the mom our friends wanted around.  She was the glue that held my family together when we fell apart, so another word I would use to describe her would be “strong.”

FB_IMG_1488311952413My mom was the one rooting us all on throughout our childhood into adulthood. As time went by my mom and dad found their differences and thought it best to separate. As devastating as that can be to any child, this was a good thing, for it would not have brought her to my amazing step dad, James. James introduced her to a more active lifestyle, that may have been the best thing that could have ever happened for my mom.

I remember the phone call from her a few years ago about wanting to do an obstacle race for the first time.  I thought she was crazy. It was a kind of shock that she would want to put herself through that much rigorous activity.  She never seemed to be interested in stuff like this before, so when she told me I was a little weary of the FB_IMG_1494206989663outcome.  She was almost 50! I didn’t want her to get hurt trying to prove something to herself.  A couple hours after she finished that first obstacle race she called me back.  I had never heard her so excited before. EVER.  She had a blast.  She told me about how she wanted to quit several times throughout the race but an incredible group of people helped her through and never gave up on her.  She said she never thought she would be able to finish it and she was so proud to have accomplished something like this before.  

I had underestimated my mother.  I learned my lesson and from that moment on she proved herself repeatedly.  She joined this amazing group called the Colorado Obstacle Racers (COR).  Mom had never felt more alive.  She would continue to set goals for herself and completely shatter those goals every single time.  Her goals became bigger and bigger.  The phrase “anything is possible” was my mom’s new motto.  She was tough, fearless, and never backed down from a challenge no matter how difficult.  Her children held the greatest honor by being able to run some of these obstacle races with her on different occasions. She would always apologize because she was slower than us.  I think I can speak on behalf of all three of us by saying that we didn’t care.  We just loved to see our mother happy and having the time of her life doing something she loved with the people she loved.

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When I say “people” she loved, I am not just talking about her children, husband or the rest of our family.  COR was her family too.  She talked about COR constantly.  The new people she met, what crazy workouts they got her into, the ops trainings, races, everything.  Her team members from COR had been incredible.  They taught her how to find her inner strength, how to be a part of a team, and how to never give up on herself.  Her COR team members were like family to her.  COR changed her life completely.  She was a better person, mother, competitor, and warrior because of COR.  She learned so many life lessons with this team.   I was fortunate enough to see my mom truly happy with herself because of COR. For that, I will forever be grateful for this group of people.  

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Please join us for the 3 COR Warriors Virtual Run!

  1. Sign Up Here
  2. Send payment via PayPal to: http://Paypal.me/corgear
  3. Additional donation can be added on to your registration that will go directly to the girls
  4. Be on the lookout for emails from Rachel

If you have any questions, please email Rachel @ rachel.hillary@gmail.com

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F-Ya! Friday: Fundraising Update

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HOLY CRAP! May the 4th was AWESOME!

Let me just take a moment say THANK YOU and WOW!!!! This week has been AMAZING for the 3 COR Warriors Virtual Run!!! With everyone sharing the posts we have 224 people signed up and counting! Yesterday alone over 300 people visited the 3 COR Warriors site and today its already off with a bang! We still have a ton of medals to sell so keep sharing everywhere!
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A main question I get asked is:

How much of the money will the girls get from this race? Well, let me tell you. We are asking $25 per entry with $20 of each entry going to the girls. The medals cost $5 each and that is all we are asking for in return. I am paying the shipping and packaging for all these medals out of my own pocket with no question or hesitation.

Wow! That is a lot of money out of your own pocket. Why?  The question shouldn’t be why but why not?! Personally, I only know Ellie first hand but have gotten to know Kym more over these past few months! When I first heard about the accident my heart broke and immediately thought what can I do to help? What people don’t realize is that almost all of us from COR are transplants (moved here from somewhere else) yet are one BIG (sometimes dysfunctional) family that do more than just race together. We celebrate weddings, graduations, accomplishments but also support, love and come together during the hard times. Colorado Obstacle Racers group opens their arms to anyone even if you are not part of the group (…yet) or a runner. When we race a majority of the elites will come back on the course to rally and help the rest us finish the race strong.
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If you don’t see the picture, let’s just say that COR is like the TV Show FRIENDS! Yes, we have our immediate families but as we get older our friends become our family too! Our captains even host a Thanksgiving and Christmas gathering for those that don’t have anywhere to go because they stand by the motto “no one should be left out or have nowhere to go”.
I know that we set a very ambitious goal for this virtual run but I figured since our OCR and running family is so HUGE and these women loved OCR and running, why not set the bar high! With that said, we have ordered 2000 medals with only 1775 left.  (you can do the math and see how much this helps the girls). With that said, please continue to share this race and sign up! We rather hold your medal until you have money to pay then lose out on getting one.
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You will feel this way too when you sign up!

Here is a breakdown on how to register:
1. Sign up HERE
2. Send $25 via PayPal: http://Paypal.me/corgear
3. Be on the lookout for emails from me!
Thats it! Simple! Some have asked how do we donate more. You can either add it on to your race entry (just make note in comments), visit the GoFundMe page or send additional money via PayPal after you run. Choice is yours but just your participation in the run means the world to these warriors and their families.

Think About It Thursday! Sign Up TODAY

Wow! The love that we have received for these ladies is beyond words! I know they personally feel all the love, support and excitement around this race. Since announcing this race we have had over 1000 people all over the world reading about it and have about 200 people signed up between Canada and the US. This is just incredible! Our goal is to get 2000 people signed up from all over the world! Check out where everyone is running

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Today, Kym went in for her 4th surgery from the accident. She finally was able to part ways with Maurice (her ostomy bag). This is just another step in her journey to a full recovery. She had a going away party this past weekend for her and Maurice. Here are a couple pics and her vibrant smile.

Both Ellie and Kym are still out of work and recovering from the accident. By participating in this race you are helping take away their financial stress, showing support and love all the while they are able to focus on their recovery.

If every person that has looked at this race, the past  month, actually signed up we would have about 1200 people from all over the world which means the girls would have $30,000! That is nuts to think about!

What is stopping you from signing up?

  • Cost? Pay when you can just sign up to hold your medal. I won’t send medals til I know money has been sent.
  • Don’t know the girls? We will be showcasing each of the women over the next few weeks to let you see how amazing they are
  • Don’t have PayPal? Ok well contact me and we can figure something out!
  • Why should you? If you have or know anyone that has been in a serious car accident you know the stress, hassle and time it takes to settle everything (average length is 3 years). Each major surgery cost around $200k depending what is being done. It all adds up fast and not even including the emotional, physical and mental challenges that don’t have a price. In a blink of an eye these women’s lives changed forever.

Let me tell you through everything that these girls have been through, their strength, love and positivity amaze me. Yes, they have their bad days but overall they stay positive and move forward. They definitely took the term “when life gives you lemons, make lemonade” to a whole new level.

MORE INFO HERE

MEDALS ARE HERE!!!!

Colorado Obstacle Racers could not be more excited to present to you the “3 COR WARRIORS” medal! These medals are 4″ in diameter, color with custom ribbon. This is a one of a kind medal that proceeds go to a great group of women and we couldn’t be more proud on how they turned out! Take a look for yourself

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Complete Medal

 

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Comparison on how BIG they are!

If you haven’t registered there is still time and medals available! CLICK HERE FOR INFO

We decided to present the medals to our 3 COR Warriors first and see their reactions below (will be updated as we post the videos)

Kym

Tiffany (Corrina’s Daughter)

Ellie

18 Things Nobody Told Me About Running

1. It’s hard…like, really hard. But just like relationships, parenting and figuring out your new iPhone, it gets easier with time. You may even–gasp—start to like it!

2. Clipping your toenails will take precedence over plucking your eyebrows some days.

3. In spite of your childhood hatred of “weird food,” your pantry will be filled with running superfoods you’re not really sure how to pronounce, like quinoa, chia, spirulina and acai.

4. At some point, you will see other runners peeing in public. You will wrinkle your nose at them: EWWW, GROSS!

5. At some point, you, too, will pee in public. You will never judge again.

6. Ditto for snot rockets.

7. When you first start, four miles seems like a lot. One day, you’ll catch yourself telling someone “I only ran four miles today.” Try not to smile smugly when that happens.

8. You’ll wince at a pair of high heels with a $100 price tag, but declare it a bargain if that same tag is on your favorite running shoes.

9. Your laundry basket will smell like a boys’ locker room. You won’t really notice (or care).

10. You’ll geek out at the opportunity to run in the rain, because it’s just that awesome.

11. There will be stretches of days when you don’t feel like running at all. It’s perfectly normal, it’s not a failure, and a few days off does a body good.

12. Like Christmas, you will be wide awake at 2 a.m. on race morning, giggling. Also like Christmas, you will not be allowed to wake anyone in the house up until 5 a.m.

13. Without any prompting on your part, family members, friends and coworkers will take up running, too. They’ll ask all the same questions you had when you started—and this time, you’ll be the one with the answers.

14. The first thing you’ll do when you book a vacation or work travel is look for races and/or cool running routes in the area.

15. “Runger” is real, and it is marvelous. Only pregnant women and runners can truly understand strange cravings at strange times.

16. While running with your friends, you will talk about food, children, current events—everything but running. During cocktail hour with that same group, when you’re showered and wearing “real-world” clothes, all you will talk about, ever, is running.

17. The friends you make through running will become like family.

18. Anyone can do it. (Yes, you!) 

The full article can be found HERE

10 Life Lessons From A Navy Seal.

I found this article online and it really is moving and awesome! Take a moment to read through it.  Here is the direct link but I have copied it below.  http://www.lifebuzz.com/10-lessons-from-navy-seal/#!RQUoD

Naval Admiral William H. McRaven returned to his alma mater last week and spoke to the graduates with lessons he learned from his basic SEAL training.

Here’s his amazing Commencement Address at University of Texas at Austin 2014 from Business Insider.

The University’s slogan is,

“What starts here changes the world.”

I have to admit—I kinda like it.

“What starts here changes the world.”

Tonight there are almost 8,000 students graduating from UT.

That great paragon of analytical rigor, Ask.Com says that the average American will meet 10,000 people in their lifetime.

That’s a lot of folks.

But, if every one of you changed the lives of just ten people—and each one of those folks changed the lives of another ten people—just ten—then in five generations—125 years—the class of 2014 will have changed the lives of 800 million people.

800 million people—think of it—over twice the population of the United States. Go one more generation and you can change the entire population of the world—8 billion people.

If you think it’s hard to change the lives of ten people—change their lives forever—you’re wrong.

I saw it happen every day in Iraq and Afghanistan.

A young Army officer makes a decision to go left instead of right down a road in Baghdad and the ten soldiers in his squad are saved from close-in ambush.

In Kandahar province, Afghanistan, a non-commissioned officer from the Female Engagement Team senses something isn’t right and directs the infantry platoon away from a 500 pound IED, saving the lives of a dozen soldiers.

But, if you think about it, not only were these soldiers saved by the decisions of one person, but their children yet unborn—were also saved. And their children’s children—were saved.

Generations were saved by one decision—by one person.

But changing the world can happen anywhere and anyone can do it.

So, what starts here can indeed change the world, but the question is… what will the world look like after you change it?

Well, I am confident that it will look much, much better, but if you will humor this old sailor for just a moment, I have a few suggestions that may help you on your way to a better a world.

And while these lessons were learned during my time in the military, I can assure you that it matters not whether you ever served a day in uniform.

It matters not your gender, your ethnic or religious background, your orientation, or your social status.

Our struggles in this world are similar and the lessons to overcome those struggles and to move forward—changing ourselves and the world around us—will apply equally to all.

I have been a Navy SEAL for 36 years. But it all began when I left UT for Basic SEAL training in Coronado, California.

Basic SEAL training is six months of long torturous runs in the soft sand, midnight swims in the cold water off San Diego, obstacles courses, unending calisthenics, days without sleep and always being cold, wet and miserable.

It is six months of being constantly harassed by professionally trained warriors who seek to find the weak of mind and body and eliminate them from ever becoming a Navy SEAL.

But, the training also seeks to find those students who can lead in an environment of constant stress, chaos, failure and hardships.

To me basic SEAL training was a life time of challenges crammed into six months.

So, here are the ten lessons I learned from basic SEAL training that hopefully will be of value to you as you move forward in life.

Every morning in basic SEAL training, my instructors, who at the time were all Vietnam veterans, would show up in my barracks room and the first thing they would inspect was your bed.

If you did it right, the corners would be square, the covers pulled tight, the pillow centered just under the headboard and the extra blanket folded neatly at the foot of the rack—rack—that’s Navy talk for bed.

It was a simple task—mundane at best. But every morning we were required to make our bed to perfection. It seemed a little ridiculous at the time, particularly in light of the fact that were aspiring to be real warriors, tough battle hardened SEALs—but the wisdom of this simple act has been proven to me many times over.

If you make your bed every morning you will have accomplished the first task of the day. It will give you a small sense of pride and it will encourage you to do another task and another and another.

By the end of the day, that one task completed will have turned into many tasks completed. Making your bed will also reinforce the fact that little things in life matter.

If you can’t do the little things right, you will never do the big things right.

And, if by chance you have a miserable day, you will come home to a bed that is made—that you made—and a made bed gives you encouragement that tomorrow will be better.

#1. If you want to change the world, start off by making your bed.

During SEAL training the students are broken down into boat crews. Each crew is seven students—three on each side of a small rubber boat and one coxswain to help guide the dingy.

Every day your boat crew forms up on the beach and is instructed to get through the surf zone and paddle several miles down the coast.

In the winter, the surf off San Diego can get to be 8 to 10 feet high and it is exceedingly difficult to paddle through the plunging surf unless everyone digs in.

Every paddle must be synchronized to the stroke count of the coxswain. Everyone must exert equal effort or the boat will turn against the wave and be unceremoniously tossed back on the beach.

For the boat to make it to its destination, everyone must paddle.

You can’t change the world alone—you will need some help— and to truly get from your starting point to your destination takes friends, colleagues, the good will of strangers and a strong coxswain to guide them.

#2. If you want to change the world, find someone to help you paddle.

Over a few weeks of difficult training my SEAL class which started with 150 men was down to just 35. There were now six boat crews of seven men each.

I was in the boat with the tall guys, but the best boat crew we had was made up of the the little guys—the munchkin crew we called them—no one was over about 5-foot five.

The munchkin boat crew had one American Indian, one African American, one Polish American, one Greek American, one Italian American, and two tough kids from the mid-west.

They out paddled, out-ran, and out swam all the other boat crews.

The big men in the other boat crews would always make good natured fun of the tiny little flippers the munchkins put on their tiny little feet prior to every swim.

But somehow these little guys, from every corner of the Nation and the world, always had the last laugh— swimming faster than everyone and reaching the shore long before the rest of us.

SEAL training was a great equalizer. Nothing mattered but your will to succeed. Not your color, not your ethnic background, not your education and not your social status.

#3. If you want to change the world, measure a person by the size of their heart, not the size of their flippers.

Several times a week, the instructors would line up the class and do a uniform inspection. It was exceptionally thorough.

Your hat had to be perfectly starched, your uniform immaculately pressed and your belt buckle shiny and void of any smudges.

But it seemed that no matter how much effort you put into starching your hat, or pressing your uniform or polishing your belt buckle—- it just wasn’t good enough.

The instructors would find “something” wrong.

For failing the uniform inspection, the student had to run, fully clothed into the surfzone and then, wet from head to toe, roll around on the beach until every part of your body was covered with sand.

The effect was known as a “sugar cookie.” You stayed in that uniform the rest of the day—cold, wet and sandy.

There were many a student who just couldn’t accept the fact that all their effort was in vain. That no matter how hard they tried to get the uniform right—it was unappreciated.

Those students didn’t make it through training.

Those students didn’t understand the purpose of the drill. You were never going to succeed. You were never going to have a perfect uniform.

Sometimes no matter how well you prepare or how well you perform you still end up as a sugar cookie.

It’s just the way life is sometimes.

#4. If you want to change the world get over being a sugar cookie and keep moving forward.

Every day during training you were challenged with multiple physical events—long runs, long swims, obstacle courses, hours of calisthenics—something designed to test your mettle.

Every event had standards—times you had to meet. If you failed to meet those standards your name was posted on a list and at the end of the day those on the list were invited to—a “circus.”

A circus was two hours of additional calisthenics—designed to wear you down, to break your spirit, to force you to quit.

No one wanted a circus.

A circus meant that for that day you didn’t measure up. A circus meant more fatigue—and more fatigue meant that the following day would be more difficult—and more circuses were likely.

But at some time during SEAL training, everyone—everyone—made the circus list.

But an interesting thing happened to those who were constantly on the list. Over time those students-—who did two hours of extra calisthenics—got stronger and stronger.

The pain of the circuses built inner strength-built physical resiliency.

Life is filled with circuses.

You will fail. You will likely fail often. It will be painful. It will be discouraging. At times it will test you to your very core.

#5. But if you want to change the world, don’t be afraid of the circuses.

At least twice a week, the trainees were required to run the obstacle course. The obstacle course contained 25 obstacles including a 10-foot high wall, a 30-foot cargo net, and a barbed wire crawl to name a few.

But the most challenging obstacle was the slide for life. It had a three level 30 foot tower at one end and a one level tower at the other. In between was a 200-foot long rope.

You had to climb the three tiered tower and once at the top, you grabbed the rope, swung underneath the rope and pulled yourself hand over hand until you got to the other end.

The record for the obstacle course had stood for years when my class began training in 1977.

The record seemed unbeatable, until one day, a student decided to go down the slide for life—head first.

Instead of swinging his body underneath the rope and inching his way down, he bravely mounted the TOP of the rope and thrust himself forward.

It was a dangerous move—seemingly foolish, and fraught with risk. Failure could mean injury and being dropped from the training.

Without hesitation—the student slid down the rope—perilously fast, instead of several minutes, it only took him half that time and by the end of the course he had broken the record.

#6. If you want to change the world sometimes you have to slide down the obstacle head first.

During the land warfare phase of training, the students are flown out to San Clemente Island which lies off the coast of San Diego.

The waters off San Clemente are a breeding ground for the great white sharks. To pass SEAL training there are a series of long swims that must be completed. One—is the night swim.

Before the swim the instructors joyfully brief the trainees on all the species of sharks that inhabit the waters off San Clemente.

They assure you, however, that no student has ever been eaten by a shark—at least not recently.

But, you are also taught that if a shark begins to circle your position—stand your ground. Do not swim away. Do not act afraid.

And if the shark, hungry for a midnight snack, darts towards you—then summons up all your strength and punch him in the snout and he will turn and swim away.

There are a lot of sharks in the world. If you hope to complete the swim you will have to deal with them.

#7. So, if you want to change the world, don’t back down from the sharks.

As Navy SEALs one of our jobs is to conduct underwater attacks against enemy shipping. We practiced this technique extensively during basic training.

The ship attack mission is where a pair of SEAL divers is dropped off outside an enemy harbor and then swims well over two miles—underwater—using nothing but a depth gauge and a compass to get to their target.

During the entire swim, even well below the surface there is some light that comes through. It is comforting to know that there is open water above you.

But as you approach the ship, which is tied to a pier, the light begins to fade. The steel structure of the ship blocks the moonlight—it blocks the surrounding street lamps—it blocks all ambient light.

To be successful in your mission, you have to swim under the ship and find the keel—the center line and the deepest part of the ship.

This is your objective. But the keel is also the darkest part of the ship—where you cannot see your hand in front of your face, where the noise from the ship’s machinery is deafening and where it is easy to get disoriented and fail.

Every SEAL knows that under the keel, at the darkest moment of the mission—is the time when you must be calm, composed—when all your tactical skills, your physical power and all your inner strength must be brought to bear.

#8. If you want to change the world, you must be your very best in the darkest moment.

The ninth week of training is referred to as “Hell Week.” It is six days of no sleep, constant physical and mental harassment and—one special day at the Mud Flats—the Mud Flats are an area between San Diego and Tijuana where the water runs off and creates the Tijuana slue’s—a swampy patch of terrain where the mud will engulf you.

It is on Wednesday of Hell Week that you paddle down to the mud flats and spend the next 15 hours trying to survive the freezing cold mud, the howling wind and the incessant pressure to quit from the instructors.

As the sun began to set that Wednesday evening, my training class, having committed some “egregious infraction of the rules” was ordered into the mud.

The mud consumed each man till there was nothing visible but our heads. The instructors told us we could leave the mud if only five men would quit—just five men and we could get out of the oppressive cold.

Looking around the mud flat it was apparent that some students were about to give up. It was still over eight hours till the sun came up—eight more hours of bone chilling cold.

The chattering teeth and shivering moans of the trainees were so loud it was hard to hear anything and then, one voice began to echo through the night—one voice raised in song.

The song was terribly out of tune, but sung with great enthusiasm.

One voice became two and two became three and before long everyone in the class was singing.

We knew that if one man could rise above the misery then others could as well.

The instructors threatened us with more time in the mud if we kept up the singing—but the singing persisted.

And somehow—the mud seemed a little warmer, the wind a little tamer and the dawn not so far away.

If I have learned anything in my time traveling the world, it is the power of hope. The power of one person—Washington, Lincoln, King, Mandela and even a young girl from Pakistan—Malala—one person can change the world by giving people hope.

#9. So, if you want to change the world, start singing when you’re up to your neck in mud.

Finally, in SEAL training there is a bell. A brass bell that hangs in the center of the compound for all the students to see.

All you have to do to quit—is ring the bell. Ring the bell and you no longer have to wake up at 5 o’clock. Ring the bell and you no longer have to do the freezing cold swims.

Ring the bell and you no longer have to do the runs, the obstacle course, the PT—and you no longer have to endure the hardships of training.

Just ring the bell.

#10. If you want to change the world don’t ever, ever ring the bell.

To the graduating class of 2014, you are moments away from graduating. Moments away from beginning your journey through life. Moments away from starting to change the world—for the better.

It will not be easy.

But, YOU are the class of 2014—the class that can affect the lives of 800 million people in the next century.

Start each day with a task completed.

Find someone to help you through life.

Respect everyone.

Know that life is not fair and that you will fail often, but if you take take some risks, step up when the times are toughest, face down the bullies, lift up the downtrodden and never, ever give up—if you do these things, then next generation and the generations that follow will live in a world far better than the one we have today and—what started here will indeed have changed the world—for the better.

Thank you very much. Hook ‘em horns.